Adventures. Words. Images.

I'm an adventurer, writer, and story teller.  Fueled by my personal mantra––the Earth is cool––I have dedicated my life to exploring as much of it as I can.  My words have appeared in Overland Journal, Expedition Portal, Bikepacking.com, Singletracks.com, Conde Nast Traveler, Nepali Times, Bikerumor.com, Gearjunkie.com, UpShift Online, Overland Magazine UK, 5280 Magazine, and other outlets. My work has been included in catalogs and promotional campaigns for REI,  Salsa Cycles, Sea to Summit, James Baroud, Bedrock Bags, and many others. And it all starts with getting off the couch and into the big wide world.

The Next Big Thing - CLEAN DRINK

In April I packed a bag, kissed my wife goodbye, and headed out the door on a five-week adventure. Unlike most of my escapes, this was not a work gig. Not really. This was something I just had to do. Call it a midlife crisis or maybe a long overdue reconing for a life spent endulging in––me––but it needed to be done. 

With help from MSR Global Health I went to Nepal to deliver water purification systems to remote villages and schools. To be sure, I am, not the first to do so. Millions of people walk the path philanthropic. It is just not one I have ever tread. But I did it. And now I'm hooked. I need the fix of seeing people's live made better with small gestures of kindness. 

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What started out as a thing I had to do has turned into a thing I want everyone to do. It appears my life's work may have landed in my lap. Only two weeks after returning from Nepal I started a non-profit organization. Clean Drink started as my thing, but it now belongs to a growing community of do-gooders. So, check it out. Get involved. It will make you feel good. I promise.

Check it out: CLEAN DRINK ADVENTURES  

 The boys of Kumu Gabar. This is not the Nepal trekkers and climbers flock to see. This is the forgotten Nepal. The place where 13,500 children die every year of waterborne illness. And that just won't do. 

The boys of Kumu Gabar. This is not the Nepal trekkers and climbers flock to see. This is the forgotten Nepal. The place where 13,500 children die every year of waterborne illness. And that just won't do.